Brunias? Buttons ft. Caribbean Free and Slave Life @ Cooper-Hewitt

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:

Collected in a 2013 post by Sarah D. Coffin, these buttons were posted on the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt blog some time ago. But material cultures of slavery never get old.

Some of her conclusions have been challenged in the comments (the author appears to confuse 18th century Dominica with Saint-Domingue), but the images appear to be renderings in the style of Bruinas or Brunias originals of figures devariascolores (black, gradations of mixed-race, and white) in 18th century dress.

The figure in the blue dress on this button, for example…

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AUDIO: Eltis on the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database | Africa Past and Present

On Africa Past and Present:

David Eltis, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University, on the making of the Transatlantic Slave Trade database,  a landmark collaborative digital project he has co-edited for two decades. Eltis discusses the research process, online dissemination, and new directions for the initiative. This is the second part of a two-part series recorded at the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference at Michigan State University in November 2013.

Episode 80: Biographies and Databases of Atlantic Slaves, Part 2 | Africa Past & Present.

AUDIO: Chivallon and Howard on Slavery & Memory in Martinique

At the 2013 workshop Caribbean Urban Aesthetics at The Open University, Christine Chivallon (with David Howard) discussed cultural heritage practices in Martinique:

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BOOK: Cowling on Women, Gender, Emancipation in Cuba & Brazil

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Cowling, Camillia. Conceiving Freedom: Women of Color, Gender, and the Abolition of Slavery in Havana and Rio de Janeiro. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013.

via UNC Press:

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BOOK: Bush on Slave Women in Caribbean Society

BushSlaveWomenCaribbean

African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.

Barbara Bush. Slave Women in Caribbean Society, 1650-1838. Heinemann, 1990.

In a 1991 review of the volume, Verene A. Shepherd wrote:

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CONF: Race and Nation in the Age of Emancipations

via the website:

“Race and Nation in the Age of Emancipations: A Symposium on the Atlantic World” seeks to explore the complicated relationship of race, citizenship, and national identity during the tumultuous long nineteenth century. By examining this connection in particular contexts within a broad Atlantic perspective, this symposium will contribute to a better understand of if, how, and why enslaved and free blacks throughout the Americas came to understand themselves as citizens of a particular nation (or possibly multiple nations) during the era of emancipation. Along with several panels focusing on varying aspects of this topic, the symposium will also feature a roundtable on the Atlantic World as a field, analytical concept, and pedagogical tool. Race and Nation is set to take place in Houston, Texas, on Rice University’s campus from February 21-22, 2014. The symposium is made possible thanks to generous funding from Rice University’s School of Humanities, the Department of History, the Humanities Research Center, the Program for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, and Culture, and the Graduate Student Association.

The conference hashtag is #raceandnation.

For more and full conference schedule: Race and Nation in the Age of Emancipations | A Symposium on the Atlantic World #RaceAndNation

Carrington on Stuart Hall | AFRICA IS A COUNTRY

Ben Carrington writes: 

Stuart Hall was the most important public intellectual of the past 50 years. In an age where having a TV show allegedly makes someone a public intellectual and where the status of the university you work at counts for more than what you have to say, Hall’s work seems even more urgent and his passing, somehow, even sadder. …

Right now I can see those who have been impacted by Hall’s work rushing to organize symposia and special issues of journals in his honor. That is all fine. He deserves to be remembered within academic spaces. But he was first and foremost an intellectual and an educator committed to socialist politics. Truly wrestling with and celebrating his life’s work means recognizing that truth. Ultimately, like the tradition of radical intellectuals of the left to which he belongs and to my mind now stands above, Hall’s legacy is one that implores us to always confront the political … and to do so with a smile and a generosity of spirit….

Read the entire piece: In gratitude to Stuart Hall, a socialist intellectual who taught us to confront the political with a smile » AFRICA IS A COUNTRY.