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EDITED: Campbell and Elbourne on Sex, Power and Slavery

Gwyn Campbell and Elizabeth Elbourne, eds. Sex, Power, and Slavery. Ohio University Press, 2014. via Ohio University Press: Sexual exploitation was and is a critical feature of enslavement. Across many different societies, slaves were considered to own neither their bodies nor their children, even if many struggled to resist. At the same time, paradoxes abound: for example, in some societies to bear the children of … Continue reading EDITED: Campbell and Elbourne on Sex, Power and Slavery

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BOOK: Cowling on Women, Gender, Emancipation in Cuba & Brazil

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Cowling, Camillia. Conceiving Freedom: Women of Color, Gender, and the Abolition of Slavery in Havana and Rio de Janeiro. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013.

via UNC Press:

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BOOK: Mattoso on Slavery in Brazil

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African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.

Kátia M. de Queirós Mattoso. To Be a Slave in Brazil, 1550-1888. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1986.

In a 1987, Maricela Medina wrote:

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VIDEO/FILM: Viramundo (with Gilberto Gil)

via official website: After decades of sold out shows and international recognition, musician Gilberto Gil embarks on a new kind of world tour through the southern hemisphere. From Bahia, he travels to the land of the Aborigines of Australia and the townships of South Africa, ending in the Brazilian Amazon region. With the same passion, Gil continues the work he began as Brazil’s first black … Continue reading VIDEO/FILM: Viramundo (with Gilberto Gil)

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Congratulations to James H. Sweet, Winner of the 2012 Douglass Prize

From the Gilder Lerhman Center: James Sweet, Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin, has been selected as the winner of the 2012 Frederick Douglass Book Prize for his book, Domingos Álvares, African Healing, and the Intellectual History of the Atlantic World (University of North Carolina Press). The Douglass Prize was jointly created by Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, … Continue reading Congratulations to James H. Sweet, Winner of the 2012 Douglass Prize

CFP: The South Atlantic, Past and Present

Call for Papers:  The South Atlantic, Past and Present Guest Editor: Luiz Felipe de Alencastro (Université Paris Sorbonne) This volume will focus on the historical, geopolitical and cultural aspects of the South Atlantic, past and present. From 1550 to 1850 most of Brazil and Angola formed a system sustained by the slave trade and intercolonial traffic that complemented exchanges between these regions and Portugal. This … Continue reading CFP: The South Atlantic, Past and Present

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BOOK: Soares on Slavery, Catholicism, and Urban Life in Eighteenth-Century Rio

Mariza de Carvalho Soares, People of Faith: Slavery and African Catholics in Eighteenth-Century Rio De Janeiro. Translated by Jerry D. Metz. Duke University Press Books, 2011. Description (Duke University Press): “In People of Faith, Mariza de Carvalho Soares reconstructs the everyday lives of Mina slaves transported in the eighteenth century to Rio de Janeiro from the western coast of Africa, particularly from modern-day Benin. She … Continue reading BOOK: Soares on Slavery, Catholicism, and Urban Life in Eighteenth-Century Rio

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CONF: Panels on Memory and Heritage of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic at BRASA 2012

Panels on Memory and Heritage of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic Region

Conference of the Brazilian Studies Association (September 6-8, 2012, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

PANEL 1: 9:00-10:45, September 7, 2012 (Friday)

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2012 Frederick Douglass Prize Finalists Announced

2012 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Finalists Announced

The finalists for the 14th Annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize have been announced.

From the announcement:

Robin Blackburn for The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights (Verso Books)

In The American Crucible, Robin Blackburn has provided one of the most commanding and wide-ranging examinations of Atlantic abolitionism in years.  In an era of specialization, Blackburn thinks big, connecting emancipation moments through both time and space. Blackburn’s work compels scholars to think anew about abolitionism’s relevance to global modernity.

R. Blakeslee Gilpin for John Brown Still Lives: America’s Long Reckoning with Violence, Equality, and Change (University of North Carolina Press)

Finding new scholarly perspectives on John Brown is no easy task but R. Blakeslee Gilpin’s engaging and ramifying book does just that by examining the myriad ways that Americans have used Brown’s memory since the Civil War era. John Brown Still Lives! offers a profound meditation on the long-running debate over slavery, freedom and the struggle for racial justice in American hearts and minds.

Carla L. Peterson for Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in
Nineteenth-Century New York City (Yale University Press)

Carla Peterson’s Black Gotham brilliantly reconstructs her own family’s elusive past as a window unto free black life in 19th century New York. Part detective tale, part cultural history, Peterson’s book recaptures hidden stories of black abolitionism, economic uplift, Civil War heroism, and turn-of-the-century civil rights movements. By painstakingly reconstructing a segment of black New York, Peterson highlights a vibrant cast of characters who constantly redefined the meaning of both American and African American freedom.

James H. Sweet for Domingos Álvares, African Healing, and the Intellectual
History of the Atlantic World (University of North Carolina Press)

James Sweet’s thoughtful and moving book about African healer Domingos Alvares provides much more than a biographical portrait of a remarkable 18th century man. Rather, Sweet’s imaginative reconstruction of Alvares’ life in and out of bondage places African worldviews at the center of Atlantic history. Domingos Alvares also makes a compelling case for redefining the intellectual history of Atlantic society from Africans’ perspectives.

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ARTICLE: Bethencourt on Creolization and Kongo Agency

  Francisco Bethencourt. “Creolization of the Atlantic World: The Portuguese and the Kongolese.” Portuguese Studies 27, no. 1 (2011): 56–69. Abstract: From In the 1930s, Gilberto Freyre’s praise of mixed-race people in Brazil challenged the idea of white supremacy, contributing to the building of a new Brazilian identity. In the 1950s, Freyre projected the idea of openness and racial mixture onto the Portuguese empire, fuelling … Continue reading ARTICLE: Bethencourt on Creolization and Kongo Agency