BOOK: Camp on Everyday Resistance in the U.S. South

CampClosertoFreedomCover

Stephanie M. H. Camp. Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

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My OAH Tribute: Stephanie M. H. Camp & Deborah Gray White

Jessica Marie Johnson:

On April 11, 2014, #ADPhD Founder Jessica Marie Johnson paid tribute to the late Stephanie M. H. Camp….

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:

Stephanie Camp1

Stephanie M. H. Camp

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Below is the full-text of the talk I gave at the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting last week. The panel was titled “Expanding the Boundaries: Power and Voice in African American Women’s and Gender History.”A separate reflection on the panel itself is incoming.

My original remarks explored power and voice in histories of slavery and Afro-Atlantic women.

It quickly became a tribute to Deborah Gray White and the recently passed Stephanie M. H. Camp.

I edited the text below for the blog-as-media and easier reading. I used formatting to replicate speech patterns, added images and links where appropriate, and included sections I skipped last Friday for the sake of time. Overall, however, I stayed true to the text as shared that day.

You are welcome to reblog, cite, circulate at will. All I ask is you respect the terms of the

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BOOK: Krauthamer on Black Slaves and Indian Masters

Black Slaves-Indian Masters

Barbara Krauthamer. Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013.

via UNC Press:

From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes’ removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved.

Krauthamer’s examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women’s gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.

20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words: Art, Politics & Intellectual Production

Gilroy The Black Atlantic

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its release. Click here to read the first post of the series and here to read the second.

Bruno Muniz continues the series with a post on art and politics in Gilroy’s ‘black Atlantic:’

“The artists and intellectuals considered by Gilroy are political beings, but not necessarily and exclusively through spoken, sung or written words. Even though there is not enough space to explore all the implications of Gilroy’s work in integrating aesthetics, politics and culture, I hope this text accomplished at least to synthesize some of his ideas that helped me a lot to think about my academic practices. The ideas being presented here are also a path to escape from the simplistic question of whether funk represents more “miscegenation” or blackness. Both options bring assumptions that cannot be ignored….”

Read the rest: Culture, politics and intellectual practice through Gilroy’s “The Black Atlantic” | Africa in Words http://bit.ly/12gFQT7

20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words: Samba, Jazz, Brazil

Gilroy The Black Atlantic

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its release. Click here to read the first post of the series and here to read the third.

Gabriel Improta continues with a post on the music of Brazil and the role culture plays in Gilroy’s conception of ‘black Atlantic:’

When looking at the cultural practices of the black Atlantic, Gilroy called for focusing on music. He criticised the obsession with the body of slaves and their descendants;  the result of a dichotomous (and Western) approach to the relation between body and mind. This dichotomy, he explains, leads to the understanding of black music (and dance) as the lowest form of art because it would be solely physical and, therefore, never intellectual. Often, music — and especially black music — is understood as a “spontaneous” or “natural” manifestation, produced by an innate talent linked to race or nationality.

Read the rest: Gilroy’s Black Atlantic: Samba, Jazz and Sambajazz in Brazil and the Black Atlantic. « Africa in Words http://bit.ly/10IuVO2

BOOK/SOURCE: HNOC Publishes Caillot’s 1729 Memoir

A Company Man

Marc-Antoine Caillot, A Company Man: The Remarkable French-Atlantic Voyage of a Clerk for the Company of the Indies. Edited by Erin M. Greenwald. 1st ed. The Historic New Orleans Collection, 2013.

via the Historic New Orleans Collection:

Recently rediscovered and never before published, Marc-Antoine Caillot’s buoyant memoir recounts a young man’s voyage from Paris to the port city of Lorient, across the Atlantic to Saint Domingue, and up the Mississippi River to New Orleans. Only twenty-one when he set sail as a clerk for the French Company of the Indies in 1729, Caillot was in many ways the ultimate company man. His descriptions of flora, fauna, and native peoples mirror the sentiments and literary conventions of his class and his era. He would spend his entire adult life in service to the company, rising high in its ranks before dying, at the age of fifty-one, in a shipwreck off the coast of India.

Yet in other ways Caillot was fully his own man, possessed of a voice both witty and prescient. An incorrigible rake—if not an outright rogue—he documents with gusto a string of pranks, parties, and romantic escapades. A persuasive self-promoter, he stakes narrative claim to New World terrain. And he speaks with immediacy across the centuries, illuminating racial and ethnic politics, environmental concerns, and the birth of New Orleans’s distinctive cultural mélange.

Brilliantly introduced and annotated by Erin Greenwald, translated by Teri Chalmers, and enlivened by Caillot’s own exquisite illustrations, A Company Man provides an intimate look at the early history of one of America’s most storied cities, placing New Orleans—and the fledgling colony it anchored—within the nexus of the French-Atlantic empire.

The original manuscript, Relation du voyage de la Louisianne ou Nouvelle France fait par le Sr. Caillot en l’année 1730, is housed in the Williams Research Center of The Historic New Orleans Collection, where it is a capstone of the institution’s rich archival holdings documenting life in French-colonial Louisiana.

EDITED: Araujo on the Politics of Remembering Slavery

"Hallelujah" Stone Sculpture

Ana Lucia Araujo, ed. Politics of Memory: Making Slavery Visible in the Public Space. Routledge, 2012.

via Routledge:

The public memory of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade, which some years ago could be observed especially in North America, has slowly emerged into a transnational phenomenon now encompassing Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and even Asia – allowing the populations of African descent, organized groups, governments, non-governmental organizations and societies in these different regions to individually and collectively update and reconstruct the slave past.

This edited volume examines the recent transnational emergence of the public memory of slavery, shedding light on the work of memory produced by groups of individuals who are descendants of slaves. The chapters in this book explore how the memory of the enslaved and slavers is shaped and displayed in the public space not only in the former slave societies but also in the regions that provided captives to the former American colonies and European metropoles. Through the analysis of exhibitions, museums, monuments, accounts, and public performances, the volume makes sense of the political stakes involved in the phenomenon of memorialization of slavery and the slave trade in the public sphere.

 

Featured Image Credit: “Hallelujah” Stone Sculpture near the site of the proposed U.S. Slavery Museum in Fredericksburg, VA / Robert A. Martin/AP via “Competing for History” | Upstart Magazine

20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words

Gilroy The Black Atlantic

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its releaseClick here to read the second post of the series and here to read the third.

Nara Improta begins with a review of the famous work:

“This year, Gilroy’s Black Atlantic completed twenty years of its publication. This book has been used by many scholars in history, anthropology, literature and sociology, and became very influential. It also provoked many criticisms. This is the first of a series of posts about the uses of Black Atlantic in recent scholarly production. Africa in Words invited academics to write about how they used Gilroy’s theories and concepts in their own work.

In this post I will (try to) explain some aspects of the concept of Black Atlantic, as proposed by Gilroy in his book. This is a big task since, throughout the book; the concept seems to acquire a very complex meaning. Some authors even think that Gilroy himself uses Black Atlantic with different definitions….”

Read the rest.

(H/T NeoGriot)

Chinua Achebe: 1930-2013

Chinua Achebe

In Depth Africa reports the death of Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe:

“Foremost novelist, Prof Chinua Achebe, is dead. He was 82.

Reporters  learnt he died last night in a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

A source close to the family said the professor had been ill for a while and was hospitalised in an undisclosed hospital in Boston.

The source declined to provide further details, saying the family will issue a statement on the development later today.

Contacted, spokesperson for Brown University, where Mr. Achebe worked until he took ill, Darlene Trewcrist, is yet to respond to our enquiries on the professor’s condition.

Until his death, Prof Achebe was the David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies at Brown.

Below is how the university profiled him on its website.

“Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe is known the world over for having played a seminal role in the founding and development of African literature. He continues to be considered among the most significant world writers. He is most well known for the groundbreaking 1958 novel Things Fall Apart, a novel still considered to be required reading the world over. It has sold over twelve million copies and has been translated into more than fifty languages.

“Achebe’s global significance lies not only in his talent and recognition as a writer, but also as a critical thinker and essayist who has written extensively on questions of the role of culture in Africa and the social and political significance of aesthetics and analysis of the postcolonial state in Africa. He is renowned, for example, for “An Image of Africa,” his trenchant and famous critique of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. Today, this critique is recognized as one of the most generative interventions on Conrad; and one that opened the social study of literary texts, particularly the impact of power relations on 20th century literary imagination…”

The Guardian reports:

“Chinua Achebe, the Nigerian novelist seen by millions as the father of African literature, has died at the age of 82.

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