Johnson on Time, Space, and Memory at Whitney Plantation (Louisiana)

If your summer travels take you to Louisiana, be sure to visit Whitney Plantation in Wallace, Louisiana (about forty miles from New Orleans). See below for #ADPhD Founder and Curator Jessica Marie Johnson’s reflection on her visit last February…. Johnson on Time, Space, and Memory at Whitney Plantation “Each statue represents a person. Most represent one of the thirty odd men and women who experienced … Continue reading Johnson on Time, Space, and Memory at Whitney Plantation (Louisiana)

A_Tale_of_Two_Plantations Screenshot FTD

DIGITAL: Dunn’s Website Compares Two Plantations (Virginia, Jamaica)

A_Tale_of_Two_Plantations

Two Plantations: Enslaved Families in Virginia and Jamaica displays research into the lives of 431 enslaved people in seven multi-generational families at Mesopotamia plantation in Jamaica and Mount Airy plantation in Virginia.

From the introduction:

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Rogers on Researching the Zealy Dagguerreotypes of Slaves (2012)

In 2012, at Mirror of Race, Molly Rogers reflected on the Jacques Zealy daguerreotypes of South Carolina slaves (now held by Harvard University). In the sum­mer of 1976, employ­ees of Har­vard University’s Peabody Museum of Archae­ol­ogy and Eth­nol­ogy dis­cov­ered fif­teen daguerreo­types in the museum attic. The pho­tographs were made in 1850 and they depict five African men and two African Amer­i­can women, all of whom … Continue reading Rogers on Researching the Zealy Dagguerreotypes of Slaves (2012)

FTDEricaAmstrongDunbar

VIDEO: Dunbar on African American Women’s History in the Digital Age (Philadelphia)

Erica Armstrong Dunbar (Associate Professor of Black American Studies and History at the University of Delaware) discusses early African American women’s history, digitization, and constructing historical narratives of black women in the 21st century.

From the announcement:

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as seen on Legacies of Slavery in Maryland: Case Studies (http://slavery.msa.maryland.gov/html/casestudies/storyindex.html)

DIGITAL: Maryland State Archives Launches Name Database

The Maryland State Archives Legacy of Slavery in Maryland: An Archives of Maryland Electronic Publication has launched “Beneath the Underground.” From the website: The Beneath the Underground database features entries of over 300,000 individuals including, white and black, slave owners, enslaved and free individuals from primarily the years of 1830 through 1880 to review. Listed below are the record series currently searchable on-line. About the … Continue reading DIGITAL: Maryland State Archives Launches Name Database

WEB/SOURCES: Registers of the Havana Slave Trade Commission Compiled by H.B. Lovejoy

via Registers of the Havana Slave Trade Commission | Desk of H.B. Lovejoy. “Between 1808 and 1848, courts in Freetown, Sierra Leone and Havana, Cuba, charged with suppressing the transatlantic slave trade, meticulously recorded the African names and physical features (sex, age, height; and evidence of ethnic scarring and small pox) for almost 100,000 people rescued off slave ships. These records are known as “The Registers … Continue reading WEB/SOURCES: Registers of the Havana Slave Trade Commission Compiled by H.B. Lovejoy

Slavery Public History

EDITED: Horton and Horton on Slavery and American Memory

Slavery Public History

James Oliver Horton and Lois E Horton. Slavery and Public History: The Tough Stuff of American Memory. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

via UNC Press:

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ARTICLES: Kopelson and Yingling on Archive and Press in Caribbean, U.S.

Articles of interest in Early American Studies (volume 11:2): Heather Miyano Kopelson, “‘One Indian and a Negroe, the First Thes Ilands Ever Had’: Imagining the Archive in Early Bermuda.” Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 11, no. 2 (2013): 272–313. Abstract: The early generations of enslaved and bonded Africans and Indians in Bermuda were essential to the functioning of the colony. But beyond their contributions to … Continue reading ARTICLES: Kopelson and Yingling on Archive and Press in Caribbean, U.S.

Hilton Petition

NEWS: Harvard to Digitize 18th and 19th Century Anti-Slavery Petitions

The Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University is digitizing eighteenth and nineteenth-century anti-slavery petitions: “…Included in the thousands of petitions are first-person accounts of former slaves and free African-Americans seeking aid and full rights. For scholars, the use of the documents will be invaluable in research and teaching…. …According to project archivist Nicole Topich, signers of the petitions include 18th-century abolitionist Prince Hall, … Continue reading NEWS: Harvard to Digitize 18th and 19th Century Anti-Slavery Petitions

VA Life Insurance Register

Shepard on Insurance Policy Registers and Post-Civil War Virginia

“Judy Batte of Hicksford, Virginia, a “house servant,” was the first African American to secure a policy, in February 1872, and she was followed by a fairly steady stream of men and women of her race. In fact, as the company grew and its client base became more national in scope, women made up an increasing percentage of policyholders…” Continue reading Shepard on Insurance Policy Registers and Post-Civil War Virginia