AUDIO: Eltis on the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database | Africa Past and Present

On Africa Past and Present:

David Eltis, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University, on the making of the Transatlantic Slave Trade database,  a landmark collaborative digital project he has co-edited for two decades. Eltis discusses the research process, online dissemination, and new directions for the initiative. This is the second part of a two-part series recorded at the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference at Michigan State University in November 2013.

Episode 80: Biographies and Databases of Atlantic Slaves, Part 2 | Africa Past & Present.

AUDIO: Lovejoy on Building Databases of Enslaved Africans | Africa Past and Present

On Africa Past and Present:

Paul Lovejoy, Canada Research Chair in African Diaspora History at York University, discusses building an international database of biographical information on all enslaved Africans. He outlines this digital history project’s contribution to the study of slavery, race, and broader themes in global history. This is the first part of a two-part series recorded at the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference at Michigan State University in November 2013. (Click here for Jessica Johnson’s Twitter timeline of the conference.)

Episode 79: Biographies and Databases of Atlantic Slaves, Part 1 | Africa Past & Present.

EDITED: M’Bow on Gender Equality, Women, and Citizenship in Africa

Penda M’Bow, ed. Hommes et femmes entre sphères publique et privée. Dakar: Codesria, 2005.

The result of a 1998 conference on gender equality in Africa, Hommes et femmes explores the position of men and women in the public and private spheres across the continent, with a special focus on the role gender inequity and sexism played in democratization and globalization.

M’Bow writes:

“La définition même des pouvoirs féminins dans un contexte de sujétion et d’infériorité constituait l’enjeu central du thème. Fallait-il comprendre ces pouvoirs comme une autorité pleine et entière détenue par les femmes dans une sphère spécifique, une autorité d’ailleurs souvent exercée aux dépens d’autres femmes comme une participation limitée et minoritaire aux pouvoirs des hommes? comme des contre-pouvoirs ou alors séducteurs, secrets et illicites? ou encore comme une ré-appropriation et un détournement (qui est retournement contre le domi- nateur) des instruments symboliques qui instituent la domination masculine? La construction d’une périodisation propre de l’évolution du statut des femmes devait être envisagée pour mieux étudier les différentes modalités du pouvoir des femmes. C’est en démêlant les relations qu’elles entretiennent aussi bien avec les hommes que les unes avec les autres que l’on pouvait comprendre comment un pouvoir féminin [se construit à l’intérieur d’un système de rapports inégalitaires.”

Edited by scholar and activist Penda M’Bow, the volume is available by chapter online. [Click Here]

EDITED: Robertson and Klein on Women and Slavery in Africa

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African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.

Claire C. Robertson and Martin A. Klein, eds. Women and Slavery in Africa. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985.

In a 1985 review of the volume, Patrick Manning wrote:

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BOOK: Allina on Slavery and Forced Labor in Colonial Mozambique

AllinaSlaveryMozambique

Eric Allina. Slavery by Any Other Name: African Life under Company Rule in Colonial Mozambique. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012.

via University of Virginia Press:

Based on documents from a long-lost and unexplored colonial archive, Slavery by Any Other Name tells the story of how Portugal privatized part of its empire to the Mozambique Company. In the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the company governed central Mozambique under a royal charter and built a vast forced labor regime camouflaged by the rhetoric of the civilizing mission.

Oral testimonies from more than one hundred Mozambican elders provide a vital counterpoint to the perspectives of colonial officials detailed in the archival records of the Mozambique Company. Putting elders’ voices into dialogue with officials’ reports, Eric Allina reconstructs this modern form of slavery, explains the impact this coercive labor system had on Africans’ lives, and describes strategies they used to mitigate or deflect its burdens. In analyzing Africans’ responses to colonial oppression, Allina documents how some Africans succeeded in recovering degrees of sovereignty, not through resistance, but by placing increasing burdens on fellow Africans—a dynamic that paralleled developments throughout much of the continent.

This volume also traces the international debate on slavery, labor, and colonialism that ebbed and flowed during the first several decades of the twentieth century, exploring a conversation that extended from the backwoods of the Mozambique-Zimbabwe borderlands to ministerial offices in Lisbon and London. Slavery by Any Other Name situates this history of forced labor in colonial Africa within the broader and deeper history of empire, slavery, and abolition, showing how colonial rule in Africa simultaneously continued and transformed past forms of bondage.

Nelson Mandela (1918-2013)

Letters to Mandela

via BBC:

“South Africa’s first black president and anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela has died at the age of 95.

Mr Mandela led South Africa’s transition from white-minority rule in the 1990s, after 27 years in prison for his political activities…”

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Rest in Power. Links and resources below:

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Tweets from the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference at #MSU

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Tweets from the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference (#ASBDmsu) held at Michigan State University, November 8-9, 2013.

Livetweeting courtesy of African Diaspora, Ph.D. on Twitter (@afrxdiasporaphd)

For more information, see here CONF: Biographies: Atlantic Slave Database Conference at MSU | African Diaspora, Ph.D. http://bit.ly/HSdWHA

FILM: Retracing African Methodism

Allen Report

This documentary project retrieves the liberation legacy of the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) in three different locations united by common narratives related to struggles against enslavement and Apartheid. In retracing the connected stories of the AME in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Namibia, the documentary reveals the extraordinary legacy of African Methodism outside the United States and contributes to the excavation of the global circuits that historically bind Africa and the African Diaspora.

The AME Mother Bethel Church was founded by Rev. Richard Allen [shown above] in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1794, and was the first Protestant church ministered exclusively by former enslaved people. While the roots of the church in the United States have been well researched, the global—or Pan-African—story of the AME has so far received insufficient attention.

As well as providing a seminal academic contribution to the history of the AME church that presents original research, the Allen Report documentary will also serve as an educational tool. The documentary will help raise awareness amongst AME and wider constituencies regarding the relevance of Black liberation theology and its hermeneutics which are still vibrating globally and growing. Additionally, this film will emphasize the contributions of the AME traditional involvement in community education and health services in its multiple geographic sites.

View TRAILER: ALLEN REPORT. RETRACING TRANSNATIONAL AFRICAN METHODISM from Alanna Lockward on Vimeo.

via Forthcoming Film on Retracing Transnational African Methodism | Repeating Islands.

ARTICLES: Maritime Slavery in Slavery & Abolition

Maritime Slavery

Special Issue of Slavery & Abolition: Maritime Slavery

2010 | Volume 31. Issue 4

Editors Note

Philip D. Morgan, “Maritime Slavery.” Slavery & Abolition 31, no. 3 (2010): 311–326.

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BOOK/NEWS: Second Edition of Jordan’s White Over Black Released

White Over Black

Winthrop D. Jordan. White Over Black: American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812, 2nd Ed. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.

via UNC Press:

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