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EDITED: Bryant, O’Toole, and Vinson on Africans to Spanish America

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Sherwin K. Bryant, Rachel Sarah O’Toole, and Ben Vinson, eds. Africans to Spanish America: Expanding the Diaspora. University of Illinois Press, 2014.

via University of Illinois Press:

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Podcast: Atlantic Bonds and Biography: from South Carolina to Nigeria | Africa Past & Present

Lisa Lindsay (North Carolina) on her forthcoming biography of James Churchwill Vaughan—whose life provides insights into the bonds of slavery and family and the differing prospects for people of African descent in the 19th-century Atlantic world. Vaughan’s odyssey took him from slavery-ridden South Carolina to Liberia and finally Nigeria, where he was involved in the Yoruba Wars, led a revolt against white racism, and founded not only the first independent Nigerian church but also a family of activists. With guest host, Laura Fair. Continue reading Podcast: Atlantic Bonds and Biography: from South Carolina to Nigeria | Africa Past & Present

BOOK: Scott and Hébrard on Rosalie de Nación Poulard

Scott, Rebecca J, and Jean M Hébrard. Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2012. via Harvard University Press: “Around 1785, a woman was taken from her home in Senegambia and sent to Saint-Domingue in the Caribbean. Those who enslaved her there named her Rosalie. Her later efforts to escape slavery were the beginning of a family’s … Continue reading BOOK: Scott and Hébrard on Rosalie de Nación Poulard

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EDITED: Campbell and Elbourne on Sex, Power and Slavery

Gwyn Campbell and Elizabeth Elbourne, eds. Sex, Power, and Slavery. Ohio University Press, 2014. via Ohio University Press: Sexual exploitation was and is a critical feature of enslavement. Across many different societies, slaves were considered to own neither their bodies nor their children, even if many struggled to resist. At the same time, paradoxes abound: for example, in some societies to bear the children of … Continue reading EDITED: Campbell and Elbourne on Sex, Power and Slavery

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EDITED: Radcliffe, Scott, and Werner on Black Intellectuals in the Atlantic World

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via U Penn Press:

Anywhere But Here brings together new scholarship on the cross-cultural experiences of intellectuals of African descent since the eighteenth century. The book embraces historian Paul Gilroy’s prominent thesis in The Black Atlantic and posits arguments beyond The Black Atlantic’s traditional organization and symbolism.

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Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

H/T – The Repeating Islands – Andrea Estrada interviews Esther Lezra on her new book The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others (Routledge, 2014): “It was important to show that the representational patterns that we use today are inheritors of an early representational rhetoric that was intrinsically tied up with material violence and injustice endured by peoples who were subjected to empire and colonialism,” Lezra said. … Continue reading Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

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DIGITAL: Banjology

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From the website:

This website is a work-in-progress by Laurent Dubois, David Garner, and Mary Caton Lingold of Duke University. Our goal is to showcase our research on the history of the banjo in the Afro-Atlantic world, including historical documents, visual materials, material objects, and musical transcription and analysis. We focus particularly on Haiti and Louisiana, but also provide information from other areas along with the transcriptions of a wide range of banjo music.

Writing the history of the banjo, especially of its early formation as an instrument, poses important challenges. We have to return to the period of the 17th through the early 19th century, and to work from fragments to reconstruct what we can about the construction, sound, and social and cultural meaning of the instrument.

In recent years there has been a proliferation of excellent research on the early history of the banjo. For a detailed investigation of some of the West African instruments that inspired the construction of the New World banjo, and an interpretations of the early history of the banjo, you can visit Shlomo Pescoe’s three excellent Facebook pages: Banjo Roots, Banjo Roots: West Africa, and Banjo Roots: World Banjo

Read the rest. The site breaks banjology into five parts:

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AUDIO: Eltis on the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database | Africa Past and Present

On Africa Past and Present: David Eltis, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University, on the making of the Transatlantic Slave Trade database,  a landmark collaborative digital project he has co-edited for two decades. Eltis discusses the research process, online dissemination, and new directions for the initiative. This is the second part of a two-part series recorded at the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database … Continue reading AUDIO: Eltis on the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database | Africa Past and Present

AUDIO: Lovejoy on Building Databases of Enslaved Africans | Africa Past and Present

On Africa Past and Present: Paul Lovejoy, Canada Research Chair in African Diaspora History at York University, discusses building an international database of biographical information on all enslaved Africans. He outlines this digital history project’s contribution to the study of slavery, race, and broader themes in global history. This is the first part of a two-part series recorded at the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference … Continue reading AUDIO: Lovejoy on Building Databases of Enslaved Africans | Africa Past and Present

EDITED: M’Bow on Gender Equality, Women, and Citizenship in Africa

Penda M’Bow, ed. Hommes et femmes entre sphères publique et privée. Dakar: Codesria, 2005. The result of a 1998 conference on gender equality in Africa, Hommes et femmes explores the position of men and women in the public and private spheres across the continent, with a special focus on the role gender inequity and sexism played in democratization and globalization. M’Bow writes: “La définition même … Continue reading EDITED: M’Bow on Gender Equality, Women, and Citizenship in Africa