BOOK: Camp on Everyday Resistance in the U.S. South

CampClosertoFreedomCover

Stephanie M. H. Camp. Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

Continue reading

BOOK: Wilder on Slavery at U.S. Universities

Wilder Ebony Ivory

Craig Steven Wilder, Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities. New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2013.

From Bloomsbury Press:

Continue reading

BOOK: Stevenson on Slave Family & Community in the U.S. South

StevensonLifeBlackWhite

African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.

Brenda E. Stevenson. Life in Black and White : Family and Community in the Slave South: Family and Community in the Slave South. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

From Oxford University Press:

Continue reading

EDITED: Hull, Scott & Smith’s Some of Us Are Brave (1982)

HullButSomeofUsAreBrave

African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place. 

In 1982, Hull, Scott, and Smith published a compilation of scholarship on the history, condition, and politics of black women in the United States. The works collected in Some of Us Are Brave spoke back to academic and policy research done in the name of black women, and challenged their absence from contemporary black studies and women’s studies curriculum. A groundbreaking interdisciplinary and activist venture, Some of Us Are Brave shaped the way women of African descent in the United States would be studied, organize, and theorize for decades to come.

Gloria T. Hull, Patricia B. Scott, and Barbara Smith, eds. All the Women Are White, and All the Blacks Are Men, but Some of Us Are Brave: Black Women’s Studies. New York: Feminist Press, 1982.

via the Feminist Press:

Bibliographies and a collection of syllabi provide readers with essential classroom materials and a map for further research. Winner of the Outstanding Women of Color Award and the Women Educator’s Curriculum Material Award.

“A clear statement about Black women. Congratulations to the editors for compiling such a fine interdisciplinary volume.”

—Geraldine K. Brookins, Ph.D., Jackson State University

“Exciting! Affirmations and the beginning of a new era, where the ‘women’ in women’s studies will no longer mean ‘white.’”

—Audre Lorde

”This is ‘necessary bread’ for women of all colors. The essays contain not only fact and durable resources, but some of the best writing I’ve seen around.”

—Adrienne Rich

RESOURCE: Slave and Free People of Color Baptismal Records in the Archives – Archdiocese of New Orleans

Slave and Free People of Color Baptismal Records in the Archives – Archdiocese of New Orleans Office of the Archives

The acts in these registers were recorded in Spanish. The Spanish phonetic spelling of a surname often varied significantly from the French spelling. In addition, first names were Hispanicized: Etienne became Estevan; Jacques became Santiago; Elizabeth became Isabella, and Hélène became Elena. Surname spelling variations multiply under the Spanish as well. Undoubtedly, some of these similar names refer to the same family. In many entries, priests, witnesses and sponsors wrote in a hand that formed different letters in exactly the same way. U/N, U/V, C/B, S/Z, A/O, and E/C are the most common instances where the letters are simply indistinguishable. This uncertainty must be kept in mind, particularly in regard to unfamiliar surnames. The Spanish priests also introduced several new variations that were not evident during the French period. “B” and “V” as well as “S” and “C” are often used interchangeably. “H” appears and disappears before such vowels as “A” and “E” while “X”, “G”, and “J” are all pronounced “H” and thus are sometimes used interchangeably in entries. “I” is often replaced by “Y” in Spanish entries. The number next to the name in the index does not refer to the page number but to the entry number….

 

Reblogged from Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog.

ESSAY: Foreman on Violence, Citizenship, and Histories of Slavery (2013)

EffectsFugitiveSlaveLAw3a05114v

Two years after Trayvon Martin was killed in Florida and weeks after the Michael Dunn verdict, African Diaspora, Ph.D. revisits P. Gabrielle Foreman’s essay on violence, bodies, and black futurity (first published February 27, 2013 at the Black Space):

Continue reading

DIGITAL/RESOURCES: Readex Highlights Five African-American History Collections

via Readex:

In 1925 Carter G. Woodson and his Association for the Study of Negro Life and History created Negro History Week. A half century later, during the U.S. bicentennial, this formal period for recognizing African American contributions to our national history was expanded to a month. At that time President Gerald Ford asked Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” During this 2014 celebration of African American History month, Readex is pleased to highlight these five new and recent resources:

The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society

Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia

African American Periodicals, 1825-1995

African American Newspapers, 1827-1998

Caribbean Newspapers, Series 1, 1718-1876: From the American Antiquarian Society

Read full descriptions here: Celebrating African American History Month: Five Acclaimed Research and Teaching Collections for African American Studies | Readex