Katrina Dyonne Thompson

BOOK: Thompson on Dance, Slavery and Performance

Katrina Dyonne Thompson, Ring Shout, Wheel About: The Racial Politics of Music and Dance in North American Slavery. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2014. via UI Press: “In this ambitious project, historian Katrina Thompson examines the conceptualization and staging of race through the performance, sometimes coerced, of black dance from the slave ship to the … Continue reading

BOOK: Ball on the Black Middle Class in the Antebellum North
Erica L. Ball

BOOK: Ball on the Black Middle Class in the Antebellum North

Erica L. Ball, To Live an Antislavery Life: Personal Politics and the Antebellum Black Middle Class. University of Georgia Press, 2013. via UGA Press: “In this study of antebellum African American print culture in transnational perspective, Erica L. Ball explores the relationship between antislavery discourse and the emergence of the northern black middle class. Continue reading

Edward E. Baptist

Baptist on What Whites Refuse to Believe About Slavery | The Guardian

“In 1845, Frederick Douglass, a fugitive from slavery, joined dozens of white passengers on the British ship Cambria in New York harbor. Somewhere out on the Atlantic, the other passengers discovered that the African American activist in their midst had just published a sensational autobiography. They convinced the captain to host a sort of salon, … Continue reading

DIGITAL: Banjology
David Garner / Laurent DuBois / Mary Caton Lingold

DIGITAL: Banjology

From the website: This website is a work-in-progress by Laurent Dubois, David Garner, and Mary Caton Lingold of Duke University. Our goal is to showcase our research on the history of the banjo in the Afro-Atlantic world, including historical documents, visual materials, material objects, and musical transcription and analysis. We focus particularly on Haiti and … Continue reading

Penn Gazette Feature On Salamishah Tillet: Scholar, Teacher, Activist
Salamisha Tillet

Penn Gazette Feature On Salamishah Tillet: Scholar, Teacher, Activist

  “As an undergraduate at Penn in the 1990s, Salamishah Tillet C’96 experienced some of the best and very worst that a young person’s college years can offer. It was here that she made lasting friendships and found the inspiring classes and mentors that sparked her ambition to become a scholar and teacher herself. And … Continue reading